Cataract Surgery Co-Management

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Cataracts are a leading cause of vision issues for people over 40 and are one of the main causes of blindness.

A cataract is described as cloudiness in your eye. This cloudiness is in the eye’s lens behind the pupil and is caused by proteins clumping together.

Cataracts can start small and develop slowly. They may not even be noticeable at first, though you may notice a slight blur in your vision. Sometimes, you can see symptoms only when you are looking at bright lights. Cataracts can continue to worsen, and you may feel the effects only once the cataracts are more developed.

There are different kinds of cataracts, and they can have different causes. Aging and other medical conditions can contribute to the development of cataracts in your eyes.

Since there are many conditions that can lead to cataracts, it is really important to visit your eye doctor regularly. It is best to catch cataracts early, and we can do that with routine examinations.

Though some medications can improve your vision, the best course of action is surgery to restore your vision. The clouded lens can be removed, and this surgery is generally successful.

Glaucoma Testing and Treatment

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Glaucoma is used to describe eye disorders that involve damage to the optic nerve. The optic nerve sends visual signals from your eye to your brain, resulting in a loss of vision.

There are several types of glaucoma. Primary open-angle glaucoma is one of the most common disorders. It results from increased pressure inside the eye, which can cause damage to the optic nerve and lead to vision loss or even blindness. This pressure can build slowly and be difficult to detect in everyday life. It may start by affecting only your peripheral vision.

Pressure is not the only indicator of glaucoma. High pressure does not always lead to glaucoma, and glaucoma can develop even with normal eye pressure. Anyone can develop glaucoma, although it is most common in people over 40.

Acute angle-closure glaucoma is not as common, but can develop much more quickly. If you are experiencing intense eye pain, redness in your eye, blurred vision, or nausea, you may need immediate medical attention. This form of glaucoma is an emergency and needs to be treated right away.

There is no way to completely prevent glaucoma, but early diagnosis and treatment can help control the condition and limit its effects. Though medication or surgery can help reduce the damage, glaucoma is not curable.

For this reason, it is important to have your eyes checked regularly. If you have certain risk factors (such as those related to age, race, family history, and previous medical conditions), we may test for glaucoma even more often.

To test for glaucoma, we use tonometry to measure the pressure inside your eye and pachymetry to measure your corneal thickness. We also examine your field of vision and your retina.

Treatment includes prescription eye drops to manage the pressure in your eyes. You may also need to add other medications, but surgery or implants may be a better option for you. Even when you are treating your glaucoma, it is important to have your eyes monitored closely for any changes.

Macular Degeneration Treatment

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Macular Degeneration is the loss of central vision due to damage to the retina. The macula is a part of the retina located on the back layer of the eye that affects the center of the visual field. Macular degeneration is often related to age and can be atrophic (dry) or exudative (wet).

The dry form of macular degeneration is most common and there is no medical or surgical treatment. The dry form occurs when debris collects between the retina and the choroid, which can cause scarring of the retina. The wet form is less common, but more dangerous. It occurs when blood vessels grow from behind the choroid, which can leak. This form of macular degeneration can be treated with laser coagulation and medication if diagnosed early.

Macular degeneration is one of the biggest causes of vision loss in adults over 50. Common symptoms include gradually blurred vision, seeing less vivid colors, and obstruction in the center of vision. Peripheral vision can remain intact, but macular degeneration can make daily activities difficult, such as reading or recognizing people’s faces.

Diabetic Retinopathy Treatment

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Diabetes comes with a lot of other problems, affecting your whole body. Even your eyes can become affected by the disease. It is so common that it actually has a name: diabetic retinopathy.

Diabetic retinopathy is a disease of the retina, which is involved in your vision. Your retina is necessary so that everything that you see is transferred to your brain.

Diabetic retinopathy usually continues to get worse, especially if your diabetes is not under control, though it can get worse even with controlled diabetes. For this reason, we recommend having regular check ups so that we can monitor your eyes. During the progression of the disease, you may not even notice any symptoms which makes it even more important to come in regularly.

The first stage of the disease involves the blood vessels in your eyes. They get really weak and leak blood into your eyes. If it continues and leaks into the center of your eye, you will have blurry vision. Your body will try to compensate by making new blood vessels but they are also weak, allowing more blood to leak into your eye. Your body might also try to form scar tissue which causes the retina to move away from your eyes and can lead to legal blindness.

Don’t hesitate to contact us today at (770) 974-3153 if you have any questions about Management of Ocular Diseases.