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Year: 2020

4 Ways To Help Your Students With Vision-Related Learning Difficulties

sad child 640An estimated 1.25 million children in North America are affected by some form of visual impairment that impacts their daily living. Ranging from nearsightedness to lazy eye to cross-eye, these visual problems can have a drastic impact on their performance in the classroom, which may lead them to lag behind their peers.

Fortunately, there are certain steps that educators can take to help their students with visual problems succeed. First, let’s explain the link between vision and learning.

Why are Visual Skills Necessary For Learning?

Because up to 80% of classroom learning is vision-based, it is no wonder that children with subpar visual skills may lag behind their peers academically.

We’re not referring to visual acuity, such as myopia (nearsightedness) or hyperopia (farsightedness), but rather the visual skills that rely on brain-eye communication. Problems with these skills can only be detected during a functional visual exam.These vision skills include eye teaming, tracking, accommodation, and focusing, all of which are critical for proficient reading, writing, and reading comprehension.

Teachers of school-aged children with poor visual skills can implement certain strategies to accommodate and even improve students’ academic performance. Below we’ve listed a few suggestions.

How Educators Can Help Students With Vision-Related Learning Challenges

1. Consider Where Your Students Should Be Seated

Make sure your students are seated facing the whiteboard. They should not have to look over their shoulder or turn around to see what the teacher is writing on the board. Some classrooms have students seated at round tables, forcing some children to turn around to see the front of the classroom. While this type of seating arrangement has its benefits, it is not appropriate for children with visual impairments, as they may find it difficult to quickly shift their gaze.

2. Pay Attention to Their Visual Needs

Try to meet the students’ visual needs. For example, if a child is expected to wear glasses for certain tasks, make sure that the child follows through. If the child doesn’t comply, consider speaking with the child’s parents.

3. Optimize Classroom Lighting

If you know that a certain student has a visual problem, seat them so that they aren’t in direct sunlight or under a shadow. Natural lighting is preferred, but when this isn’t possible, tungsten light bulbs are generally favored by the eye over fluorescent lighting. Please note that any flickering light bulb should be changed without delay.

4. Choose a Teaching Method That Accommodates Their Vision

Below are steps you can take to help students with poor visual skills:

  • Use black or dark-colored markers on the whiteboard. Avoid bright colored markers like orange, red, and yellow.
  • While writing on the board, say the words/numbers aloud to assist those who may have difficulty reading or seeing the text.
  • Avoid using language that relies heavily on vision, such as “like this one” or “over there.”
  • Be patient when a student with subpar visual skills stares off into space or daydreams. This is often a symptom of visual dysfunction, rather than a lack of attention.

How We Can Help

At Acworth Family Eyecare, our goal is to help each child reach their full potential by strengthening any visual skill deficiencies.

We treat children with many types of visual dysfunctions, often using a specialized form of therapy called vision therapy. Vision therapy trains the eyes to focus better or work as a team (among many other visual skills) by strengthening the eye-brain connection.

To learn more or to ask any questions, contact Acworth Family Eyecare today.

Acworth Family Eyecare serves patients from Acworth, Woodstock, Kennesaw, Cartersville, and throughout Georgia.

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Protect Your Children’s Vision By Getting Them To Play Outside This Winter!

child playing snow 640As temperatures drop, some parents may be wondering how to get their kids outside for some healthy outdoor play.

Below, we share tips on fun outdoor activities you can do and explain why playing outside can help your child’s vision.

How Outdoor Play Impacts Myopia

Studies have shown that children who spend at least 11 hours per week outside during daylight hours have a slower rate of myopia progression than children who don’t. Although researchers aren’t exactly sure why, it appears that sunlight and the child’s use of distance vision outdoors may play a role.

So why would parents want to slow down their child’s myopia? The answer may surprise you.

Having myopia in childhood places the child at heightened risk for developing sight-threatening eye diseases later in life. These include cataracts, macular degeneration, retinal detachment, and glaucoma.

3 Outdoor Activities to Do With Your Kids This Winter

Play With Snow

Whether you have a toddler or a teenager, playing with snow is something that everyone can enjoy. Bundle up your child so they stay safe and warm, and send them out to build a snowman, have a snowball fight, build an igloo, or make a snow angel. Older children and teens may enjoy building a snow maze.

If your kids like a bit of competition, you can conduct a snow castle building contest. This activity can be fun for the entire family!

If you don’t have enough snow to build a snowman or castle, you can play tic-tac-snow on the snow-covered ground.

Go Sledding

Sledding and tobogganing are classic winter activities that your child will love. All you need is a sled and a snowy hill — easy, right?

But before you soar down those snowy slopes, here are some guidelines that will ensure a safer sledding experience:

  • Use a sled that can be steered and has a brake
  • Protect your head with a helmet
  • Dress warmly, but leave your scarf at home, as it can get caught under the sled
  • Children under the age of 6 should always sled accompanied by an adult

Create Outdoor Art

This activity is perfect for kids who like to get a little messy. To make a colorful masterpiece on a canvas of snow, give your child a few squirt bottles filled with water and a few drops of food coloring gel. They’ll have heaps of fun squirting the colored liquid on snow or ice.

They can also paint on snow using watercolors and a paintbrush.

If it doesn’t snow where you live, you can always give your child some sidewalk chalk and let them get creative on the pavement. The important thing is to have your child play outdoors.

At Acworth Family Eyecare, our goal is to help slow down your child’s myopia progression and keep their eyes healthy for a lifetime.

To learn more about our myopia management program or to schedule your child’s eye exam, call us today!

Acworth Family Eyecare serves patients from Acworth, Woodstock, Kennesaw, Cartersville, and throughout Georgia.

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Want To Discuss Myopia? Call 770-974-3153

Sports Vision Training Can Help Prevent Sport-Related Head Injuries

playing hockey 640Each year, between 1.7 million to 3 million sports and recreation-related concussions occur in the U.S. alone. Of those, roughly 70-80% of the people experience vision problems.

So how can you prevent head injuries? Consider sports vision training. It not only improves performance but can also protect your head from injury.

What is Sports Vision Training?

Sports vision training isn’t about correcting your eyesight.

Rather, it’s a customized program made to improve the communication between your eyes, brain, and body while playing sports. It helps amateur and professional athletes process information and then react faster and more accurately to what they see on the field, court, or rink.

Sports vision training uses a personalized series of techniques and exercises, that teaches the brain and body to respond more accurately and efficiently to the fastball or hockey puck rapidly coming toward you. The training focuses on improving visual skills, such as depth perception, hand-eye coordination, eye tracking, focusing, and peripheral vision.

Sports Vision Training and Sport-Related Head Injuries

Head injuries, especially concussions, are among the most common injuries incurred while playing sports. However, they can be prevented!

If your visual skills are not functioning at their peak, you may misjudge the distance between yourself and the ball or yourself you and other players. Miscalculating the velocity of a ball or the positioning of other athletes due to poor peripheral vision can result in serious injury, head or other.

Just as you train your muscles to be at your peak, so too, you must train your eyes to communicate more efficiently with your brain and body.

Does Sports Vision Training Lead to a Decrease In Sport-Related Injuries?

Studies show that players who undergo sports vision training have significantly fewer concussions than their peers.

One study, conducted by the University of Cincinnati Division of Sports Medicine, found that university football players who underwent sports vision training to improve their peripheral vision had fewer concussions than those who did not undergo the training.

In short, sports vision training teaches the the eyes and brain to react better to the changing environment, leading to increased success with fewer injury-causing collisions.

Want to take your game to the next level? Contact Acworth Family Eyecare today.

We serve patients from , Woodstock, Kennesaw, and Cartersville, throughout Georgia.

 

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Does Your Head Hurt? You Might Have Binocular Vision Dysfunction

headache womanHave you been struggling with headaches or migraines with little to no relief? If so, you might be suffering from binocular vision dysfunction (BVD).

A standard eye exam generally won’t identify BVD. That’s why it’s important to consult a neuro-optometrist if you’re experiencing headaches or migraines.

What is Binocular Vision Dysfunction?

Binocular vision dysfunction is a condition where your eyes are misaligned, leading the eye muscles to strain to transmit one clear image to your brain. This can result in head pain, migraines and several other symptoms. If the problem is BVD, a neuro-optometrist can diagnose the condition and provide effective treatment.

Common Symptoms of Binocular Vision Dysfunction

People with BVD typically experience some of these symptoms:

  • Sensitivity to light and glare
  • Double vision
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Eye strain
  • Fatigue or tiredness
  • Reduced attention span and concentration difficulties
  • Shadowed, overlapping or blurred vision
  • Dizziness
  • Light-headedness
  • Nausea
  • Anxiety
  • Motion sickness
  • Poor depth perception
  • Neck, upper back or shoulder pain

If BVD is the cause of your symptoms, specialized prismatic optical lenses that allow the eyes to regain their alignment can usually provide prompt relief.

Learning Disabilities and Reading Symptoms

Having even slightly misaligned eyes can also disrupt learning and reading.

Binocular vision dysfunction can tire your eyes while reading. Words may blend together, and you may skip lines or lose your place while reading.

A routine eye exam isn’t geared toward diagnosing BVD, so if your child complains of headaches and is struggling with schoolwork, get them assessed by your neuro-optometrist today.

Treatment for Your Headaches and Binocular Vision Dysfunction

Unlike standard eyeglasses, BVD lenses are specialized aligning lenses that allow your eyes to work together. Once your eyes are working together, the brain will receive one clear image. Your eye muscles will then be able to relax and release the tension that can cause headaches and migraines. Your eye doctor can play a significant role in treating these symptoms.

If you suffer from headaches, you may have BVD or another vision problem. Schedule a vision evaluation at Acworth Family Eyecare as soon as possible. The earlier a vision problem is detected, the sooner you can receive a comprehensive treatment plan to achieve clearer and more comfortable vision.

Acworth Family Eyecare serves patients from Acworth, Woodstock, Kennesaw, Cartersville, and throughout Georgia.

 

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Gift The Gift Of Sight Month

Acworth Family Eyecare How Do I Know If Contact Lenses Are Right for Me?

The month of December has been declared “The Gift of Sight Month” by Prevent Blindness — the nation’s oldest non-profit voluntary eye health organization. Never heard of Prevent Blindness? Read on to learn more about the organization and what “The Gift of Sight Month” means to them.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Myopia or Nearsightedness , Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Acworth eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

What Is Prevent Blindness?

Founded in 1908, Prevent Blindness was established by volunteers to decrease the amount of preventable blindness in children. They helped to almost eliminate a condition called ophthalmia neonatorum, a leading cause of blindness in infants at the time.

Over the years, volunteers at Prevent Blindness have conducted the first nation-wide glaucoma screenings, assembled resources for the development of vision-testing equipment for infants, and conducted a national study which showed that blindness prevention is the third most important eye health concern among Americans.

With over 8 million individuals affected by blindness in North America, the work of Prevent Blindness is significant and necessary for the betterment of everyone’s eye health, sighted or not.

To this day, Prevent Blindness continues to spread awareness and spearhead legislation of various health concerns.

So, What is “The Gift of Sight Month”?

Prevent Blindness has given December this title in hopes of giving people an opportunity to contribute to their cause. They are asking that fully-sighted people reflect on the joys and privileges that accompany healthy vision and to donate to Prevent Blindness.

Because Prevent Blindness is operated by volunteers and is not for profit, they need financial help to continue their mission of preventing blindness and preserving sight.

Why not be part of the cause and help protect and preserve healthy vision? Prevent Blindness is asking that anyone who is able to donate to their organization, please do so. To be part of this important cause, go to the Prevent Blindness website and show your support.

To learn more about how to keep your vision healthy for a lifetime, visit an optometrist near you. For all eye health matters in the Acworth area, call Acworth Family Eyecare for an eye exam.

Book an eye exam at an eye clinic near you to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you.

Acworth Family Eyecare, your Acworth eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

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The Importance of Eye Exams for Contact Lenses

Are you planning on wearing contact lenses for the first time? Do you need a new contact lens prescription? Are your current contacts not as comfortable as you wish they were? Your eye doctor will perform a contact lens eye exam to ensure that your vision with contacts is clear, comfortable, and safe, providing you with the right lenses for you. 

What is a contact lens exam?

If you wear or want to wear contact lenses, you’ll need an eye exam for contact lenses, in addition to your regular comprehensive eye exam. Special tests are performed during a contact lens exam to evaluate your eyes and vision with contacts. 

Are eyeglass prescriptions the same as contact lens prescriptions?

No, a prescription for glasses cannot be used for contact lenses. An eyeglass prescription is for lenses that are positioned approximately 12 millimeters from your eyes, whereas a contact lens prescription is measured for lenses that sit directly on the surface of your eye.

The prescription for contact lenses also includes the brand, lens diameter and curvature, which are not part of an eyeglass prescription.

Contact lenses fitting: One size does not fit all

One contact lens size doesn’t fit all eyes. If a contact lens is too flat or too steep for your corneal shape, you may experience discomfort or even eye damage. Your eye doctor will take certain measurements to determine the best contact lens design and fit for your eyes. 

Corneal curvature

This measures the curvature of your eye’s clear front surface (cornea) so the eye doctor can select the optimal curve and diameter for your contact lenses. If your eye’s surface is somewhat irregular because of astigmatism or other conditions, you may require a special lens. 

Pupil and iris size

The size of your pupil and iris (the colored part of your eye) is also important in determining the best contact lens design.

Tear film evaluation

This test evaluates the quality of your tears, to determine whether they will be able to keep contact lenses and your cornea sufficiently hydrated throughout the day. If you have dry eye disease, standard contact lenses may not be right for you. 

Trial lenses

Following the eye exam, you will be provided with trial lenses to verify that the chosen contact lenses offer clear and comfortable vision. This will allow the eye doctor to make any fine adjustments to the prescription.

Contact Lens Eye Exam Near You

Wearing the correct contact lenses for your eyes allows you to enjoy all of the benefits of wearing contacts, while keeping your eyes healthy and comfortable. 

If you’re already a contact lens wearer, visit your eye doctor at least once a year to make sure the lenses are still providing you with optimum vision and comfort.

Contact Acworth Family Eyecare in Acworth to book your contact lens eye exam today!

Acworth Contact Lenses Supplier

Acworth Family Eyecare How Do I Know If Contact Lenses Are Right for Me?

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Acworth eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Local Contact Lens exam in Acworth, Georgia

Have you been wearing eyeglasses for years, but now, you can’t deal with the way your glasses fog up when wearing a face mask? Or were you just diagnosed with a vision condition and can’t figure out whether to choose contacts over glasses? Our eye doctor shares some facts to help you make the right decision for you.

Contacts Fit an Active Lifestyle

If you’re an athletic type and constantly on the move, glasses can shift or slip off your nose. Also, flying objects can hit your eyeglasses, breaking the lenses or frames and possibly causing an eye injury. Tell our optometrist about your lifestyle so we can fit you with the most appropriate type of contact lenses; we stock a wide variety of types in our modern eye clinic.

Hard vs. Soft Contact Lenses

Depending on your particular eye condition, our eye care professional will recommend either soft or hard contact lenses.

Soft contact lenses are certainly the more popular option nowadays. Made from silicone hydrogel, they allow a large quantity of oxygen to reach the eye. Soft lenses also come in various wearing schedules: daily disposables, bi-weekly disposables, and monthly disposables. The advantage of dailies is that you insert a fresh pair every morning, which drastically reduces the chances of eye infection, dryness and irritation.

When contact lenses first hit the market, they were available only as hard lenses. But the uncomfortable hard lenses of yesteryear bear little resemblance to today’s hard lenses – usually called rigid gas permeable lenses. These rigid GP contacts are often ideal for people who have an irregularly shaped cornea.

How to Reduce the Risks of Contact Lenses

Our eye doctor is careful to point out that anytime you insert something into your eye, you’re introducing the risk of infection. As we mentioned, daily disposables decrease the incidence of infection, but there are effective ways to lower your risks even if you wear a different type of lenses, such as:

    • Always wash your hands before touching your contacts or your eyes.
    • Follow proper hygiene by soaking your contacts in disinfectant overnight. Replace the solution entirely each day, and never use water to rinse or store them.
    • Replace your contact lens case every three to six months.
    • Don’t try to make your contacts last longer than the wearing schedule recommended by your optometrist. Discard them according to schedule.
    • Don’t sleep in your contact lenses, unless directed to by your optometrist.
    • Use moisturizing artificial tears eye drops if you have dry eyes.

    What Type of Contact Lenses Are Best?

    That’s not a question that can be answered without an eye exam and advice from a qualified eye care provider. There are a wide range of types of contacts, such as soft, rigid gas permeable, toric, multifocal, monovision, scleral, hybrid and ortho-k lenses. Book a consultation at our eye clinic to learn more about the types of contact lenses suitable for your eyes.

    Contact lenses are medical devices, which means it is illegal to sell them without a prescription from an eye doctor. When not fitted properly to the shape and curvature of your eye, contacts can deprive your eyes of oxygen and cause infection. They can also lead to a sore on the surface of your eye, which can result in scarring and permanent vision loss. Well-fitting contact lenses allow tears to flow beneath the lenses, providing your eyes with essential oxygen and nutrients. Also, your eye care provider will provide instructions on how to insert, remove and care for your contact lenses responsibly.

    Book an eye exam at an eye clinic near you to learn more about your candidacy for contact lenses and which type is right for you.

    Acworth Family Eyecare, your Acworth eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

    Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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    5 Facts About Scleral Lenses

    happy teenagers 640Scleral contact lenses are large-diameter gas permeable contact lenses that vault over the cornea and rest on the “white” of the eye (the sclera). In doing so, the lenses form a dome over the irregular cornea that provides clear and comfortable vision for individuals with keratoconus, dry eye and other ocular surface conditions.

    Here are 5 facts about scleral lenses and why they are a great choice for many patients.

    1- They work when nothing else will.

    Patients with an irregularly shaped cornea, whether due to natural causes, an eye condition or complications following surgery, can at times develop vision problems that cannot be corrected using glasses or soft contact lenses. In such cases, scleral lenses provide a more comfortable, stable, secure fit, and improved vision.

    For those with keratoconus, scleral contact lenses provide advanced care that resolves visual distortions and creates clear vision while providing a comfortable wearing experience.

    In addition to helping those with keratoconus, scleral lenses are also recommended for those with an astigmatism, particularly for high astigmatism that other contacts cannot comfortably correct.

    2- Scleral contacts provide relief for those who suffer from dry eye.

    Unlike traditional contact lenses, scleral lenses minimize eye irritation. Since they vault over the dry, irritated cornea and sit on the sclera, they offer comfort and clear vision. Sclerals leave a space between the lens and the cornea containing a liquid reservoir of artificial tears that provides a protective cushion that soothes the eye.

    This is crucial, because even blinking can irritate the eye or injure the cornea due to the mechanical friction of the eyelids on the cornea. Scleral lenses can act as a shield between a patient’s eyes and their eyelids, protecting the eyes from further irritation or damage.

    3- Sclerals are long lasting lenses.

    Constructed from high quality, durable materials, these rigid gas permeable contacts typically last 1-3 years. Therefore, while the initial cost of scleral lenses is higher than standard contacts, you’ll benefit from maximum value for your money.

    While scleral lenses are long lasting, it is important to book follow up visits with your eye doctor to determine when it’s time to replace them with a new pair, so as not to harm your cornea.

    4- Scleral contacts are worth the cost

    People assume that because sclerals must be fitted and customized to fit each individual eye, they are exorbitantly expensive. In fact, the lenses are often covered by insurance and certain vision and health savings plans.

    These lenses provide enough of an improvement over regular lenses — in both comfort and vision — to justify the investment.

    5- Scleral lenses are very comfortable.

    Some people mistakenly assume that rigid contacts aren’t comfortable. In reality, scleral contact lenses are very comfortable because they don’t touch the cornea and lubricate the eyes.

    If you have irregular corneas, dry eye or hard-to-fit eyes, scleral lenses may be right for you. Find out more about scleral lenses by scheduling an eye exam at Acworth Family Eyecare today!

    Acworth Family Eyecare serves patients from Acworth, Woodstock, Kennesaw and Cartersville, throughout Georgia.

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    Can Scleral Lenses Help You? Find Out! 770-974-3153

    Are Face Masks Causing Dry Eye Symptoms?

    woman wearing a mask 640Face masks and social distancing have become the first line of defense in COVID-19 prevention.

    While these protective measures are essential to combating the virus’ spread, eye doctors are seeing an increase in dry eye cases among people who wear masks. If you are seeking relief, contact us.

    What is Mask-Associated Dry Eye (MADE)?

    Mask-associated dry eye (MADE) was first described by an ophthalmologist in May 2020 based on the higher rate of dry eye he was seeing in his practice among patients who wore masks. Patients with existing dry eye reported worsening symptoms when wearing a mask.

    When a face mask doesn’t fit securely, it can push air from the nose and mouth upward, onto the eyes, causing the tear film — the liquid layer that coats the eyes’ surface — to evaporate more quickly. This leads to MADE.

    Dry eye leaves the eyes feeling sore, gritty, dry and irritated. Left untreated, dry eye can cause damage to the cornea.

    There are many causes of dry eye, including eye and health conditions, age, gender and certain medications. Insufficient blinking when looking at a digital device or book, poor indoor air quality and pollution can all play a role. Situations that increase how quickly the tear film evaporates can quickly and significantly dry the eye’s surface, leading to more pronounced symptoms.

    What Causes Dry Eye When Wearing a Mask?

    Wearing a face mask significantly reduces the spread of air when breathing out from the mouth and nose. Instead of moving out, the air moves upwards towards the eyes’ surface. This forces a stream of air over the surface of the eye, causing the tears to evaporate more quickly.

    This is the same reason that eyeglasses fog up when wearing a mask.

    When masks are worn for long periods of time, this repeated evaporation may lead to dry spots on the eyes’ surface.

     

    How to Prevent or Alleviate MADE?

    Here are some simple measures to help reduce dry eye while wearing a mask:

    1. Ensure your mask fits well, and consider taping the top edge to prevent air from rising from your mouth toward your eyes.
    2. Limit your time in air-conditioned or heated environments when possible. Also, take regular breaks from digital devices.
    3. Consult your eye doctor, who will examine your eyes and prescribe the best treatment.

    Having to wear a face mask to prevent COVID-19’s spread may cause dry eye, but relief is available. Contact Acworth Family Eyecare if you are experiencing dry eye symptoms. We will determine the underlying cause of your dry eye and offer you the best solution so you can get back to having comfortable eyes and vision.

     

    Acworth Family Eyecare serves patients from Acworth, Woodstock, Kennesaw and Cartersville, throughout Georgia.

     

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    Do You Think You Have Dry Eye? Call 770-974-3153

    Acworth Digital Eye Strain relief.

    Acworth Family Eyecare Rising Risks of Digital Eye Strain During Quarantine

    Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Myopia or Nearsightedness, Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Acworth eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

    Our Eye Doctor Shares Tips to Prevent Painful Computer Vision

    You and your kids are staying home, practicing social distancing in order to reduce the potential spread of Covid-19. It’s certainly the responsible, safe thing to do. However, the current stay-at-home lifestyle has also led to people spending more time on digital devices. Screen time is dedicated to both work and leisure, which keeps everyone busy and entertained, but unfortunately, it has also led to a higher rate of digital eyestrain and other vision complications.

    More people of all ages have been visiting our eye clinic complaining of uncomfortable or painful vision, and our optometrist regularly diagnoses digital eyestrain. To protect yourself from a range of annoying symptoms, read these eye care tips to prevent computer vision problems:

    • Pay attention to position

      When you sit down at your office desk, it’s probably equipped with ergonomic furniture and set at the perfect height. But your home workspace may not meet the same requirements. Take care to position your computer screen about an arm’s length and slightly beneath your line of vision. This will protect both your eyes from strain, as well as your posture and neck. Additionally, good back support will reduce discomfort caused by sitting for long periods. To reduce glare and accompanying eye fatigue, point your screen away from any bright lights.

    • Take coffee breaks

      Even if you’re not in the mood for another java, regular breaks to stand up and stretch are vital for your body and eyes! Get up and walk around your house a bit. Any activity that allows you to look away from your screen will give your body and eye muscles a well-needed respite.

    • Watch for warning signs

      In general, our eye doctor hears patients complain about the following computer vision symptoms when they visit our eye clinic:

      1. HeadachesWhen the pain is concentrated at the front of your head, it’s typically vision related. When it’s at the back of your head, it’s usually posture related. If your temples are throbbing, it’s probably tension.
      2. Neck and shoulder painThis is a direct result of a poorly positioned workspace. Your chair, screen, desk and keyboard all need to be aligned correctly for healthy posture.
      3. Blurry visionIf blinking clears up your sight, it could indicate a dry eye problem. But if your blurred vision usually occurs at the end of the day, it could point to mild farsightedness that’s being exacerbated by so many hours of close work.
      4. Dry eyesProlonged screen time leads to reduced blinking, which leaves your eyes exposed and compromises your moisturizing tear film. Burning or itching eyes are usual symptoms of dry eye syndrome.

      Computers can compromise children’s eye health

      During quarantine, kids depend heavily on digital devices for entertainment and socializing. There are no afternoon clubs or groups to attend, minimal opportunities to socialize, and education itself has become remote in most places. Computers are filling a range of roles in kids’ lives.

      While digital tech has been highly successful at keeping children occupied and happy, research also shows that kids who don’t spend time outdoors are at an increased risk for myopia (nearsightedness) and progressive myopia, especially if it runs in the family.

      During the pandemic, more and more parents are bringing their children to our eye care provider for eye exams. The most typical signs of a problem include:

      • Squinting at the TV or moving closer and closer to the screen
      • Headaches, particularly at the end of the day
      • Difficulty reading (when they didn’t have previous trouble)
      • Problems sleeping at night

      Tips from our optometrist

      • Practice the 20-20-20 rule for ocular health: every 20 minutes, look 20 feet into the distance for 20 seconds. This will help your eyes feel comfortable for longer.
      • Keep appropriate distance from screens: mobile phones should be about one foot from the face, desktops and laptops should be about two feet away, and TV screens should be about 10 feet away
      • Encourage kids to engage in physical activity outdoors, taking permitted walks or even kicking a ball around the backyard
      • Drink enough to stay hydrated
      • Remember to blink regularly
      • Don’t use digital devices within 2 hours of bedtime, so the blue light doesn’t disrupt your circadian rhythms

      Suffering from digital eye strain? Our eye doctor can help! Stop by our eye clinic to learn more about various strategies and products that can prevent and soothe the painful symptoms of computer vision.

      Acworth Family Eyecare, your Acworth eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

      Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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